You are currently viewing 393. Gary Hamilton’s Peterson 80s Tenon Extension Project

393. Gary Hamilton’s Peterson 80s Tenon Extension Project

 

The Starting Point

 

PETERSON’S SUPREME

 


MADE IN
IRELAND
80s

The Tenon Has Internal Threading To Accept A Tenon Extension
Threading Is Metric M4.5 X 0.75

 

The Mortise Is Drilled Deeper Than Required (1-1/2”) Than Typical
The Draft Hole Enters On The Top

This Pipe Exhibits All The Features Of The “Sub-System” Design But It Is Missing The Tenon Extension

The Draft Hole Diameter Through Both The Stem Body & Shank Measures 3.5MM

 

Turning The Diameter To 4.5MM For External Threading

 

Cutting External Threads With The M4.5 X 0.75 Threading Die

 

Center Drilling & Through Drilling Of The Tenon Extension To 3.5MM Diameter

 

Tenon Extension Threading Finished & Test Fit To Stem

 

Turning & Shaping The Tenon Extension

 

Tenon Extension Cut To Length & Final Finishing

 The Ending Point

 

With Tenon Extension

 

Ready For The First Smoke

 

PETERSON’S SUPREME
MADE IN IRELAND
80s

 

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Sébastien Canévet
Sébastien Canévet
1 month ago

Even I’m not unclever with a toolbox, I’m impressed…

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago

Sebastien, thank you so much for the compliment, it is very much appreciated.

Martin
Martin
1 month ago

I´m always very exited with a blog entry about lathe work. Very good work on this one.

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  Martin

Martin, Thank you for the compliment! And yes, lathe work is truly fascinating!

Martin
Martin
1 month ago

Hi Gary what is this round sharp tool called? This is perfect you can make your workpiece
1/4 round and shape the desired diameter in a few steps brilliant.
One question I have left how you determine the kind of thread on an existing workpiece
metric/imperial specially on the small scale ?
Thanks on your 101 with chimneys.

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  Martin

Martin, The round cutter is a carbide cutter, 3/8″ diameter. Typically, this is called a “form tool” in the world of machining, in the sense that the cutter is shaped and ground to yield the shape you want on the finished product. This is helpful in repetitive tasks so the shape is consistent in the finished product when making multiple items. I buy them already sized and ground sharp to the shape I need. Sometimes I have to shape and grind my own from a carbide blank. On determining the thread, I have a multitude of thread pitch gauges that… Read more »

Al Jones
Al Jones
1 month ago

I’m envious of that kind of mechanical skill!

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  Al Jones

Al, would you believe that I’m still learning as I go?

Stephen
Stephen
1 month ago

Excellent work! I’m glad you made the threaded side longer than the ‘stock’ condensors found in today’s pipes. Let us know how it smokes…

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  Stephen

Hi Stephen, and thank you for the comment. I’m pretty sure that Mark will be writing very soon about your astute observation regarding the longer length of the tenon extension. You are correct in that the factory tenon extension found in current production pipes are not true to the original concept that Charles Peterson obtained a patent for so many years ago. It’s interesting how things can change over time. Would you believe I’ve yet to smoke it? I did all this just a day or so prior to leaving for the pipe show, and in all my excitement since,… Read more »

Marlowe
Marlowe
1 month ago

,,,and I thought a pipe was just for smoking. Brilliant. Way beyond my skills.

Richard B
Richard B
1 month ago

Nice work Gary, from a toolmaker perspective. I would have tapped a scrap piece of brass and tapped it for the tenon. You should never hold a work piece by the finished threads. Make of lathe?

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
15 days ago
Reply to  Richard B

Hello Richard, I’m a bit tardy to reply,and thank you for the comment. The make of the lathe is a 1964 Atlas / Clausing. With the specific use of a collet chuck, I have found no adverse affects to work holding on a finished thread. And I have successfully performed this specific task many times. I fully agree with your suggestion, especially when a 3-jaw chuck is to be used. However, with the collet chuck, the clamping force is equally distributed across the entire circumference and length of the part being gripped. This results in a less likely chance for… Read more »

Jonathan Gut
Jonathan Gut
1 month ago

Very nice work Gary!

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  Jonathan Gut

Hi Jonathan, I thought you might like this story. We had a great time at the Pipe Show, I sure hope to see you there at the next one!

James Walsh
James Walsh
1 month ago

Fantastic work Gary! I’m sure you have been rewarded with a fantastic smoke!

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  James Walsh

James, if you see my note for Stephen you will be amazed that I’ve yet to smoke it…I have no idea what is wrong with me, I even took the pipe to the Chicago show…In all the excitement, I forgot I had it with me…until I got home and was unpacking….good grief.

Paul Combs
Paul Combs
1 month ago

Nice work Gary – looks great! 🙂

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  Paul Combs

Hi Paul, from one machinist to another, thanks! I sure missed seeing you at the show, hopefully next year!

Scott Forrest
Scott Forrest
1 month ago

Someday I’ll have to get a lathe. This reminds me of the most frustrating pipe I own: an unsmoked 80S with a bone white bone tenon extension. I just can’t bring myself to start the bone coloring process 🙂

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  Scott Forrest

Hey Scott, if you ever get a lathe, be warned, it is addictive just like PAD or TAD…I’ve got three lathes now and they are so much enjoyment in the shop! If you don’t start the bone coloring process on that 80s now, someone, at sometime in the future will do it. You might as well be the one to do it now!

Terry Carpenter
Terry Carpenter
1 month ago

Pipes, tampers, and maybe, just maybe, fountain pens. Is there nothing you can’t do, Gary? Great to see and talk to you, Mark and Ken in Chicago.

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago

Hey Terry, Wow it was a blast to see you and Trese at the show this year…talk about fun!!!
I’ll let you know about the fountain pens…I picked up some really great looking material at the show that would make a fantastic pen body….I’ll keep you posted.

D.H. Billings
D.H. Billings
1 month ago

Impressive work!

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago
Reply to  D.H. Billings

D.H., Thank you sir, and your comment is most appreciated!

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
29 days ago

To all fellow “Pete Geeks”, while at the Chicago Pipe Show Mark told me he had run this short photo essay story of my work on the 80s. I’ve just made it home and now have time to respond to all the inquiries you have left regarding the story. Hopefully I will be able to answer all the questions you have asked, albeit a bit on the tardy side. But we did have a GREAT time at the Chicago Show!

Rick Myerscough
Rick Myerscough
26 days ago

You guys amaze me with all your abilities to make things… Gary.
Blessings…

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
24 days ago

Rick, thank you so much!

Linwood
Linwood
26 days ago

Gary, superb work! Oh for a lathe and time! Years ago (that’s decades) I did take two semesters of machinist class – a smattering of what shop procedures should be (it was more set up and safety than turning), and our final was to turn a sphere – the more perfectly round determined grade after all of that time. A week later I squeked out a B- and felt lucky to get that! I admire your work! And, gosh, that mortise IS drilled deep! Great meeting you at the show!

Gary Hamilton
Gary Hamilton
24 days ago
Reply to  Linwood

Hi Linwood, it was such a pleasure in meeting you in person at the show! And I do hope to see you at the CORP show this year! I miss shop class, it was always so much fun for me, and what I learned then then has just continued on into the present. I wonder if they even offer shop classes in schools these days? with all the litigation happy folk out there, a minor scrape in shop class would most likely end up in a major court case. Good grief!
Yes, that “factory mortise” is cavernous!